BLUSAS Forum » Freeview HD » FVP 4000T, 5000T

Power useage

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    Faust

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    Just a general question. Do manufacturers no longer have to include how much power their products use?

    I was looking at the manual for the FVP 5000T and noticed the only reference to power usage is the specs for the power brick and the amount of power used by the product in low power standby i.e. 0.5 watt.

    I cannot see any information (unless I'm losing the plot which could be possible) about how much power the machine uses when it's switched on or when it's operating.

    Humax isn't the only manufacturer I have come across who now no longer routinely includes this type of information.

    | Mon 26 Mar 2018 14:29:33 #1 |
  2. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson

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    Presumably the power brick has a output current rating. Pretty sure it's rated to output 12V DC so multiply the current rating by 12 to get the maximum power in watts which I guess will be recording 4 and watching a 5th or recording 4 and playing back a recording. The twin tuner boxes uses about 30W or so when on.

    | Mon 26 Mar 2018 14:53:15 #2 |
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    Faust

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    grahamlthompson - 8 minutes ago  » 
    Presumably the power brick has a output current rating. Pretty sure it's rated to output 12V DC so multiply the current rating by 12 to get the maximum power in watts which I guess will be recording 4 and watching a 5th or recording 4 and playing back a recording. The twin tuner boxes uses about 30W or so when on.

    The manual quotes the following - 12V 2.5A (Standby under 0.5W).

    Not sure how my post got into the 'welcome' category? Certainly the HDR 2000T uses 30 watts Graham.

    | Mon 26 Mar 2018 15:06:08 #3 |
  4. gomezz

    gomezz

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    I think regulations only impose a limit for standby power usage on such devices but not restrictions for when in use.

    | Mon 26 Mar 2018 15:53:57 #4 |
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    Faust

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    gomezz - 1 hour ago  » 
    I think regulations only impose a limit for standby power usage on such devices but not restrictions for when in use.

    It used to be the case that just about every electrical product would quote the power usage, many still do. Humax used to do until not that long ago.

    Yet another example of treating the consumer as a mushroom.

    | Mon 26 Mar 2018 17:17:23 #5 |
  6. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson

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    Faust - 53 minutes ago  » 

    gomezz - 1 hour ago  » 
    I think regulations only impose a limit for standby power usage on such devices but not restrictions for when in use.

    It used to be the case that just about every electrical product would quote the power usage, many still do. Humax used to do until not that long ago.
    Yet another example of treating the consumer as a mushroom.

    You can only quote a maximum power which would indicate a max of 30W. We know the 4000/5000T powers down unused tuners to save power so it will depend on what the box is doing.

    There's no point in stating the power requirement of a box with an external power supply as the max is obvious.

    | Mon 26 Mar 2018 18:14:00 #6 |
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    Faust

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    grahamlthompson - 4 hours ago  » 

    Faust - 53 minutes ago  » 

    gomezz - 1 hour ago  » 
    I think regulations only impose a limit for standby power usage on such devices but not restrictions for when in use.

    It used to be the case that just about every electrical product would quote the power usage, many still do. Humax used to do until not that long ago.
    Yet another example of treating the consumer as a mushroom.

    You can only quote a maximum power which would indicate a max of 30W. We know the 4000/5000T powers down unused tuners to save power so it will depend on what the box is doing.
    There's no point in stating the power requirement of a box with an external power supply as the max is obvious.

    Well given your former career Graham I expect it is obvious to you.

    However, I suspect if you took a click board round to your local shopping centre, stopped people and asked them what the power draw for said external power brick was you would get almost 100% blank stares.

    | Mon 26 Mar 2018 22:33:15 #7 |
  8. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson

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    Faust - 12 hours ago  » 

    grahamlthompson - 4 hours ago  » 

    Faust - 53 minutes ago  » 

    gomezz - 1 hour ago  » 
    I think regulations only impose a limit for standby power usage on such devices but not restrictions for when in use.

    It used to be the case that just about every electrical product would quote the power usage, many still do. Humax used to do until not that long ago.
    Yet another example of treating the consumer as a mushroom.

    You can only quote a maximum power which would indicate a max of 30W. We know the 4000/5000T powers down unused tuners to save power so it will depend on what the box is doing.
    There's no point in stating the power requirement of a box with an external power supply as the max is obvious.

    Well given your former career Graham I expect it is obvious to you.
    However, I suspect if you took a click board round to your local shopping centre, stopped people and asked them what the power draw for said external power brick was you would get almost 100% blank stares.

    Well most O level kids would know that power in a DC circuit is volts x amps. It gets more complicated with ac as phase angle between voltage and current affects the power (you have to add the Cosine of the angle to volts x amps)

    A pure capacitance has a phase angle of 90 degrees (current leads voltage) and a pure inductance also has a phase angle of 90 degrees (voltage leads current). Cosine 90 is zero so in both cases power is zero regardless of voltage and current.

    The power drawn from the mains will be a bit higher anyway as nothing is 100% efficient, transformers can be in the high 90% though.

    | Tue 27 Mar 2018 10:48:54 #8 |

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